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Bilateral Amblyopia: What is it About?

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Bilateral Amblyopia

Amblyopia, commonly known as “lazy eye,” affects millions worldwide. While unilateral cases, where one eye is weaker, are well-known, bilateral amblyopia, which affects both eyes simultaneously, is gaining attention.

Imagine living in a world where everything appears hazy, blurry, or even nonexistent. This is the reality for individuals with amblyopia in both eyes. In this post, we’ll explore bilateral amblyopia, provide an overview of the condition, and discuss its treatment options.

Let’s Explain Unilateral Amblyopia First: What is Unilateral Amblyopia?

Most cases of amblyopia are unilateral and relatively mild. Unilateral cases usually occur due to anisometropia or strabismus or a combination of the two, and in the minority of cases due to visual deprivation.

When diagnosed early, the treatment is usually relatively easy and effective and includes corrective glasses, eye patching or penalization, and/or vision training.

Bilateral Amblyopia Means Amblyopia in Both Eyes

In some rare instances, however, amblyopia can also present bilaterally, which requires a somewhat different approach to treatment. Put simply, bilateral amblyopia is a condition in which both eyes do not see as clearly as they should. In essence, it’s neurological confusion.

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Causes of Bilateral Amblyopia: Bilateral Optic Abnormalities

Bilateral cases of amblyopia occur due to bilateral abnormalities of the anterior segment of the eye that result in blurry images that fall on retinas of both eyes.

Examples include any form of bilateral optic opacities that lead to bilateral visual deprivation, such as congenital cataract, corneal opacities, or hemorrhages in the vitreous. Those are often congenital but can also be acquired later in childhood.

Another possible etiology of such amblyopia is severe bilateral refractive abnormalities, which comprise of bilateral high astigmatism (cylinder) or high hypermetropia (plus diopter).

Bilateral amblyopia diagnosis

Diagnosis of Bilateral Amblyopia

Diagnosing such amblyopia involves a comprehensive eye examination performed by an ophthalmologist or optometrist. The assessment may include visual acuity tests, a thorough evaluation of eye movement and alignment, and a check for refractive errors.

In some cases, additional tests like optical coherence tomography (OCT) or visual field testing may be recommended to assess the extent of the condition and rule out other potential causes.

Bilateral Amblyopia Treatment: Different Approaches for the Same Goal

While the treatment goal for bilateral cases of amblyopia is exactly the same as for unilateral ones—to restore visual acuity and binocular visual function—the way to get there, for obvious reasons, slightly differs.

Patching, for instance, which is very effective in unilateral cases, is of no benefit in bilateral ones, as both eyes are equally deprived and covering one does not do anything. Hence, it is even more important to address the cause that led to amblyopia, whether it be the extraction of bilateral cataracts or simply prescribing correct refractive glasses that will eliminate the severe astigmatism of hypermetropia.

1. Eyeglasses or Contact Lenses: Eyeglasses or corrective lenses are often the first line of treatment for such amblyopia associated with refractive errors. They help to compensate for nearsightedness, farsightedness, or astigmatism, enabling better vision.

Eyeglasses and contact lenses can treat bilateral amblyopia.

2. Vision therapy: Needless to say, though, when the cause of bilateral amblyopia has been properly addressed, vision therapy can also help accelerate the recovery of visual acuity.

Vision therapy utilizes a series of exercises and activities designed to improve eye coordination, focusing abilities, and depth perception. It is often recommended in cases where strabismus or other binocular vision problems contribute to amblyopia in both eyes.

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3. Surgical Interventions: In certain instances, surgery may be necessary to correct underlying issues like cataracts or strabismus that are causing bilateral amblyopia.

Conclusion

Bilateral amblyopia presents unique challenges for those affected, as it impairs vision in both eyes and affects depth perception and coordination. Early detection and intervention are crucial for a better prognosis. For treatment, it is important to address the underlying causes of amblyopia.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is bilateral amblyopia?

Bilateral amblyopia refers to a condition where both eyes have reduced visual acuity or poor vision. Amblyopia itself is a visual disorder characterized by the brain’s inability to process visual information properly, despite the absence of any structural abnormalities in the eyes.

What causes bilateral amblyopia?

It can have various underlying causes, which ultimately result in reduced visual acuity in both eyes. Examples include any form of bilateral optic opacities that lead to bilateral visual deprivation, such as congenital cataract, corneal opacities, or hemorrhages in the vitreous.

What is the treatment for bilateral amblyopia?

Eyeglasses or corrective lenses are often the first line of treatment for bilateral amblyopia associated with refractive errors. They help to compensate for nearsightedness, farsightedness, or astigmatism, enabling better vision. When the cause has been properly addressed, vision training can also help accelerate the recovery of visual acuity.

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Why Do We Suggest a Minimum Time of 6 Months for Success?

Based on the data from over 15,000 patients using AmblyoPlay, improvements start within 4 months, while optimal results take anywhere between 6-18 months on average. The duration of required training depends on the patient’s age, the severity of the problem, accompanying diseases, and adherence to the training program.